Thursday, December 22, 2011

Fit to Fly 2012



Are you fit to fly in 2012?






60% of the 78 million the baby boomers have set goals to get fit in 2012. Over half of those choosing to get active have joint pain, and may need help in getting started.

In 2012, consider a true group practice, able to meet your schedule at your chosen time. With 11 Physical Therapists working together, we can meet your schedule to help your pursuit of fit to fly.

And January of 2012, we offer you complimentary one-week medically based fitness program, for you to see the difference for yourself.

Consider PTW first to help you
- Manage return to activity
- Lose weight with an aching joint
- Get strong while protecting your joints
- Get one on one care in a private practice setting

Call today (215) 855-9871 for a complimentary week to PTW, rated best PT in 2011!

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

When Did Your Light Turn On??








Nice conversation with a young man the other day, as he was asking certain things about life, the future, and his aspirations.


His dim light is getting brighter, he is starting to "get it". Proud of him, more years to come for the light to fully go on.






At what age did your "Light" go on? Me, about 20 years-old, after about a year in the Military. I finally realized what "it" was, and very busily started to finally plan my future.






Bob Babb

Friday, October 28, 2011

Are You Kidding Me: SNOW!

Snowmen coming early this year I suppose.

Top Three things to remember for tomorrow and Sunday:






1. Use a plow shovel If you can. These specialty shovels are available at your local hardware store, and work well with the lighter snow less than 4 inches deep. As you push the snow (plow), push it with the shovel on an angle, plowing the snow off to one side without ever having to pick up the shovel.


2. Cutting the load in half is a way to protect your back from the heavy torque on your back. The further the shovel is away from your body, the more stress is placed on your back. Lighten the load and keep the load close to you, flicking the snow off the shovel instead of throwing it far from your center of gravity.


3. Shovel in short bursts. Your back will benefit from frequent rests, protecting it from overuse. Two clear tracks on the driveway to the street is often enough to get your car out and get you to work.



OK folks, I see the clouds coming in now. Lets get ready to go get em, and do just that!



Don't forget to click onto our website, download the survey, fill it out, bring it in, and receive a free T-Shirt!!




Robert Babb, PT, MBA








Monday, October 17, 2011

Rake .....away back pain!



















Wow, have you seen the fall foliage this year?

Beautiful as it may seem, its not when your back hurts and you have to rake the leaves on a cool windy day!

Raking can cause stress and strain on muscles and joints, especially for seniors or those who are normally sedentary. The shoulders, back, neck and knees are prime targets.

Following these tips can help you minimize the risk of injury:

1. Warm up first.
A brisk walk with your spouse, your favorite pet, or your neighbor will do.

2. Light stretches might help!

Try stretches (1, 2, 28, 29, 56 and many others) located at http://www.ptwinstitute.com/video

Also, consider a lumbar support if your back is weak or sore (see example, no. 71, http://www.ptwinstitute.com/video)



Other Things to remember:

Move the right way: Lead with your feet, this will limit your twisting

Use knee pads, a long handled shovel when able, and consider a garden cart or wagon

Take it easy, take frequent breaks!


If you experience pain or may not be sure of what to do, contact us to schedule some time with one of our licensed Physical Therapists.

PTW—Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute—has been offering quality care for those recovering from injuries, surgeries, muscle traumas and skeletal disorders since 2002. PTW also offers pre-operative conditioning, as well as medically based exercise and sports training services. With locations in Lansdale, Quakertown, Montgomeryville, and West Norriton, PTW offers convenient, quality care provided by a team of 10 licensed physical therapists. Their facilities feature state of the art exercise equipment and a large AQUATIC CENTER in Lansdale.

Many of PTW's Physical Therapists have earned the priveledge to practice with direct access (NO REFERRAL NEEDED), so that clients may contact them directly without a referral from a physician.


PTW has been recognized nationally for their outstanding programs and services. Locally, PTW has been voted as the best Physical Therapy Practice by readers of The Reporter and Philadelphia Inquirer, and was awarded the Chamber of Commerces Business of the year in 2008.

For more information on PTW, visit their website at: http://www.ptwinstitute.com/ or call us at
(215) 855-9871.

Thursday, October 6, 2011

FAIL FIRST therapy for those with chronic conditions?


See this video on managing chronic pain and conditions.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdYav3WEg6k


Insurance companies decisions in these situations promote many things both physically and mentally, none very positive for those with legitimate pain.



1. Physically, a wasting of soft tissue. This includes muscles that support joints, diminishing an affected person's function. There are hundreds of sub points here.

2. Mentally, it promotes a "FEAR AVOIDANCE" affect, well documented in our literature as the fear of moving during or after a painful episode. Picture keeping your elbow in a sling because it hurts, then taking it out of the sling 2 weeks later to have a catch with your son. You lose strength, length, and function of the muscles, joints, and supporting structures.

How about those with blood disorders? Lets take the Hemophilia affected, were now talking about possibly taking a life if the medications don't work during a bleed! I am familiar with some doctors would not permit this to happen to these type of patients.
 
The difficulty with the Chronic pain group, the insurance companies often state it is because pain is sometimes psycho-somatic, and pain is subjective, so there is no real way to measure it.

Seems any form of FAIL FIRST therapy regimens place the decisions in the insurance companies board rooms, not in the doctors mind and prescription pad.

Robert Babb, PT, MBA



Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Phils Spirit Raises Performance


http://www.ptwinstitute.com/



Years ago, the Phillies were the laughing stock of the National League.  Teams put together over the winter with free agents won World Series', the Yankees always seemed to be in the playoffs, while by August Philly fans were more focused on Eagles training camp than the Phillie's September swoon.

This hometown-team baseball apathy no doubt left me in a sour mood.  As a season ticket holder, it was drudgery just making my way down the expressway into the stadium to watch a team that didn't seem to care play without passion in their final months of the season. A painful process was made more painful by the fact the food was overpriced and cold, the stadium only partially filled, and the management was calling us a small market.

Fortunately, 5 years ago, the baseball spirit came back, the the emotional painful experiences disappeared. 

Much like baseball, the atmosphere created in a Physical Therapy center can lift or dampen your spirits.  We strive to practice practice with positive energy, empathetic programming, with some simple goals of saying hello and goodbye, thank you, while keeping your therapy essential with evidence driven care. We hope this eliminates any negative experiences you may be having with your physical injury. 

Even though we hope you never get injured, we are here if you need us.  If injury does happen, and you need to visit us, we will perform (like the current Phils!) in a way that you look forward to visiting us, no matter how physically painful our stretching may be! 

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

PTW Earns Specialization- Best Standards of Practice




From the OCCUPRO Industrial Medicine Specialists out of Kenosha, WI, we recieved this:

"We would like to congratulate the Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute on its recent accomplishments in pursuing higher level return-to-work programming within its rehabilitation practice.  Following completion of OccuPro's Comprehensive Industrial Rehabilitation Training, your facility has been accredited by OccuPro as a clinic that specializes in the treatment of the injured worker.

Your practice has demonstrated the core competencies and is deemed proficient in performing industrial rehabilitation and return-to-work functional testing to include the following services:

Functional Capacity Evaluations
Functional Progress Notes
Functional Discharge Summaries
Job Demand Analysis
Work Hardening/Conditioning Evaluation and Treatment

Congratulations on your clinic's accomplishment as one of the national leaders in this industry"

10 years in the making, the PTW crew will continue to pursue industries best standards of practice.

Flu Shot Season - Arriving!




PTW's Limber Limb 6-week program will lengthen your tight body!

To Celebrate National Physical Therapy Month, The Physical Therapy and Wellness Institute (PTW) will offer flu vaccinations on Tuesday, October 11th, in our Lansdale location. Flu shots will be provided by the nurses of the Visiting Nursing Association between the hours of 10 am and noon at PTW located at 730 S. Broad Street, Lansdale, PA. No out of pocket expenses for Medicare card holders and some private insurance plans.


Refreshments, tours, and giveaways will be offered, including a 6 week Wellness Program, valued at $249. PTW’s 10 condition specific wellness programs are designed to give you a Physical Therapist directed program for chronic conditions such as joint pain, diabetes, fibromyalgia, osteoporosis, and many others. For more information, contact our customer relations rep Danielle Taylor at 215 855 9871, log onto www.ptwinstitute.com, or stop by today for a tour. 

Thursday, September 22, 2011

PTW's Crystal Burnick wins Philly Half Marathon for her age!!

PTW would like to congratulate our own Crystal Burnick on placing FIRST in her division at the Rock'n'Roll Philly Half Marathon! Crystal is imperative to the success of our newest office in West Norriton. She is a recent graduate from Slippery Rock University with a degree in Exercise Science. North Wales Running Company is lucky to have her as a part of their running team, who also placed very high as a whole at the race!

Top row: Bob Bacon (Hatfield PA) Derek Reinhold (North Wales PA), Jesse Clancy (Lansdale PA), Mark O'Neill (Lansdale PA)

Bottom Row: Crystal Burnick, (Collegeville PA),Paul Bojczuk (Souderton PA), Brett Rogowski (North Wales PA)





Monday, September 12, 2011



Evils, Enablers, and Exercise
Joint pain, spine pain, stomach pain, sciatica, tennis elbow, plantar fasciitis, cancer pain—the list grows longer as folks age. I often wonder what makes my patients “give up” because of the pain. I wonder what it means to “give up,” what it is they are “giving up,” and what evils lie beneath that prevent them from experiencing a good day of get up and go. To answer these questions we need to first understand some key definitions.




Even though hand and wrist pain may slow you down, you can still remain active.


The give-up

This occurs when patients throw up their hands over things out of their control. They become frustrated to the point they stop all pursuits. The causes of their frustration may include minor disabilities, chronic aches and pains, systemic diseases, and a long list of conditions that create impairments.

What is  “giving up”?

Because of the “evils” that prevent many individuals from taking care of themselves, there is an exchange of items, or “give ups.” These include independence, function, a free mind, comforts of life, communications with others, meaningful relationships.

Forces of evil

Evils are habits, thoughts, and actions that make up who a patient is. There are two types of evils: good evils and bad evils. Each has its place in a patent’s battle for fitness.

Bad evils are habits, thoughts, and actions an individual chooses that limit a healthy lifestyle. Bad evil habits include eating after 8 p.m., sleeping 5 hours a night, and exercising once a month. Thoughts, too, may be evil. Examples of bad evil thoughts are: “I don’t need to drink water” or “I don’t need to work out today.” Actions may be evil as well. Playing basketball without proper warmup is an example of a bad evil action.

Bad evils can also take the form of peer pressure. Neighbors, friends, family members, and schoolmates may all potentially offer reasons to not get up and exercise, enabling the patient’s own disabilities. Peers may offer subtle suggestions such as “It’s OK to stay home and rest today,” or “Take another medication.” These suggestions tempt a patient toward a path of inactivity, ineptitude and apathy. Physicians and physical therapists, too, can be complicit in this evil by suggesting “Don’t do it if it hurts,” instead of “Let’s find a way to get you functional!”

Help patients slay these evils by equipping them with a common sense understanding of their conditions. Help them develop tools that will help them reach their goals. Encourage them to make connections with enablers who will support their fitness progress with strategies designed to keep them happy, healthy, and independent.

In contrast to bad evils are “good evils”—activities which may not feel the best, but are essential health and well-being. Also known as “necessary evils.” An example of a good evil habit to encourage a patient to adopt is to stop eating at 6 p.m. Good evil thoughts include: “I’ll give up a diet soda today for water,” or “I’ll exercise Saturdays instead of playing X box,” or “I will get this done now.” Patients should also be encouraged to perform good evil actions, such as warming up, stretching, and playing a sport.

The consequences of evil

Patients should understand if they balance the evils of life—both good and bad—they will experience more success in their lives on all levels. Exercise is key. Therapists must help patients find the means to exercise, even if it requires convincing the patient to rise at 5 a.m. Strength training is also a necessary evil, stretching too. Patients who are affected by chronic pain particularly should practice good evils, since loss of function places them at risk of “giving in.”

What are the evils of exercise?


Good evils include stretching after a warm up phase. Why is stretching an evil? Many patients are gym members, but few use the facilties for strecthing. Men go to the gym to train, get stronger, and bulid their biceps. Women go to keep down their weight, look tone, and—more often than men—participate in group activities. Patients must realize that without stretching they will grow stiff and lose elasticity. Stretching is a necessary evil.

What evils apply to patients battling joint pain? Determine this by looking at the compression of the lower extremities. What are the most compressive exercises for cardio training? The answer, in order of most compressive to least compressive: treadmill, EFX, Nu-step, and bike. All are great warmups prior to stretching. If a patient’s arthritic knee joint hurts, the patient should consider the treadmill a bad evil because of the compressive forces that occur. In place of the treadmill suggest the bike to provide degenerative joints with movement for synovial flushing. The bike is a good evil.

 Patients who have joint pain may struggle to maintain independence. For these individuals strengthening large muscle mass while protecting joints is critical. Strategic strengthening of larger muscle groups around joint pain, performed with purposeful functional strategies, offers the greatest return. For example, strengthening the larger back muscles requires some pulling activities of the arms, such as lat pulldowns or a seated row. For individuals who have degenerative arthritis of the wrist, this may be difficult and painful to perform. A bad evil for patients who have degenerative arthritis of the wrist is push ups, a good evil is therapy band presses performed supine, with the bands wrapped around the wrist.

Conclusion

Physical therapists are enablers. They are creative by nature and training, and the health care providers best suited to help those with joint pain exercise safely and maintain independence. Helping patients understand good evils and bad evils can help them sustain an effective exercise strategy, and avoid “giving up” the treasures of independence and functional ability.



Robert Babb, PT, MBA, is owner and a practicing physical therapist at the Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute (www.ptwinstitute.com). Robert can be contacted at therababb@comcast.net


Tuesday, September 6, 2011

YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN PAIN.....






But why would you do that?

If pain relief is around the corner, take advantage of PTWs abilities!

12 Physical Therapists, 4 Locations, Aquatic Therapy, Industrial Medicine Specialists, Balance Certified, Spine and Joint Experts...

Don't just take our word, stop by today for tour to help understand how PTW could help you improve in work, recreation, or just functioning around the home.

The Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute

Lansdale, Quakertown, Montgomeryville, and West Norriton, PA

(215) 855-9871

www.ptwinstitute.com





Monday, August 22, 2011

Consumerism = Choice




Old health care was passive. For instance, years ago, our parents may have:


- Visited their doctor when they were sick
- Visit the providers that the doctor referred them to
- Been loyal to the doctor


Today's health care is active, requiring you to participate in your care, take care of yourself, and be your own health care advocate. For instance, you may decide:


- To take a educated, holistic approach towards your sickness, treating it yourself.
- Decide to visit a health care provider different than that your doctor recommended

- Decide to change doctors based on various factors (specializations, location, etc)


Consumerism in health care is choice. Customers (patients) will chose their health care services based on location, word of mouth recommendations, brand recognition, and a whole lot more. Those organizations that strive for industries best standards, keep their business line simple, and provide direct benefit to their customers with a fair and reasonable price will continue to prosper, no matter how challenging the economy may be.


At PTW, we will constantly and consistently work towards the holy grail...exceeding our customers expectations each and every visit.




Robert Babb, PT, MBA

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Soft Skills





From our customers, I often hear complements about the PTW staff. Phrases like "They are great people", "They work so hard", to "They listen and work together so well". Sometimes they go on to say, "You must have trained them well".

Truth is, we don't train a bit on the soft skills of our employees. Soft skills are what get you hired. Soft skills get you far, and separate you in a crowd.

This weekends Philadelphia Inquire referenced soft skills in this past weekends classified section. Summarized from several articles, soft skills that separate strong employees from others include:

1. Networking :

All employees ability to "spread the word" is crucial to an organizations success, and their own. All employees should be part of the organizations outreach!

2. Enthusiasm:

People excited about life will be excited about the organization.

3. Communications:

Ability to "Listen", ability to utilize human and physical resources correctly.

4. Teamwork :
How the group intuitively works with each other, ability to finish each others sentences!

5. Conflict Resolution Working through difficult situations together, seeing problems through your customers eyes.


6. Critical Thinking

Analyzing and striving for "best practices" results into critical thinking.

7. Problem solving

Solve difficult situations methodically and consistently with company principles in mind.




At PTW, we have the best of what PT has to offer. What differentiates PTW employees from others?


Its the soft skills the staff obtains from their past histories (THANKS Moms and Dads!), and their past experiences that get them in the door.



Robert Babb, PT, MBA

Friday, July 22, 2011

Intuition wins! (GPS your intuition)






Funny thing happened yesterday, spending time near downtown Philadelphia...second time in as many weeks.


Someone said to me "I am late to this place because the GPS took me the wrong way".


It made me reflect on my patients comments, sometimes feeling helpless with joint pain. This is found in comments they have such as "I now have a high sugar count and have gained weight because I can't exercise".


Truth is, the driver of the car was not forced to drive that way. A voice in a box simply told them turn right, possibly against their own intuition.


If your joint pain is keeping you from running, don't let it get the best of you. Find ways to strength train with lighter weights, more reps, keeping your heart rate up. Find ways to eat better, less frequent, or less volume.


Like the GPS voice, the appeal of the mass marketing (Burgers, Fries, Soda, Beer, Ice Cream) voice will tell you one thing, but let your intuition take you the other way.


Always let your intuition win.



Monday, July 18, 2011

Jump it now! Obese, overwieght, or a warning sign?






Jumping to better health!






Is your child obese, slightly overweight, or just a warning sign about future disease. Its important to know the differences in Bodyfat and BMI.



BMI


A BMI of 18 to 24 is considered norm (acefitness.org/calculators/BMI-calculator/aspx)


In the end, the BMI may not tell you about your child's general health and wellness right now, but may be an excellent indicator about potential future disease (diabetes or heart disease).


Body Fat


Is the estimated amount of fat that makes up your son's or daughter's overall weight.


Ideal numbers are all over the internet. Understanding your body fat helps you understand your general level of fitness now.


So, use both numbers for your child to understand how they are now (body fat) and understanding their potential for systemic disease as they age!










Monday, June 27, 2011

Vacations Close?



78 Million Baby Boomers.

125 Million people going on Vacation this summer.


4 PTWs to help you get from here to there, in less pain, with more mobility, enjoying life the way it ought to be for you.


Call today for relief tomorrow. You deserve a painfree vacation!


215 855 9871

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Montgomeryville Physical Therapy Video

Videos for our website are done, next month, you will see home exercise instruction of many of our commonly issued home exercises.

Friday, June 17, 2011

Lansdale Physical Therapy - Live to Learn













An old saying goes "If you live to learn, you learn to live"

Live to learn by your mistakes, make change, alter your route, then you learn to live!


Like this guys physical performance, do you have joint pain when you run?

Try: Run with new sneakers. Still no change.
Try: Run on softer surface, or the other side of the road? Still has joint pain after running.
Try: Run with less intensity, less speed, shorten your stride. Still has joint pain after running.
Try: Run on a treadmill. Still has joint pain.
Try: Running in water. No joint pain.

This fellow did 2 weeks of running in the water, each day followed by land exercises for strengthening the quads, hams, and hip musculature.

Then 2 weeks of EFX at 120 to 150 strides per minute, levels 8 through 12, with land exercises as above.

Then 2 weeks of running at 4 mph to 6 mph on the treadmill, land exercises.

Then returning to road running, 60% of previous performance, building up 5% each week.

No joint pain.

This fella lived to learn, and as a result, learned to live life to its fullest! Back running.

Thursday, June 9, 2011

Doom the Rheum!



Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic, sometimes disabling disease that includes joint pain, muscle shortening, swelling in the joints, and a host of other symptoms that can limit your activity.




The American Physical Therapy Association research (June 2011, JAPTA) reports that individuals who attend a Physical Training program that includes cardiovascular exercise, education, and self-management strategies will help! Improvement in the cardiovascular conditioning can lead to better quality of life and in many...promote participation of recreational and sport activities.



So, if your off your tennis game cause of those achy joints, give a Physical Therapy professional a call to see how they can help you get back on your game!












Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Wanna Lose Weight for arthritis? Supersize your expectations!!



The American Physical Therapy Association reports study this month (JAPT, Jun, 2011) that researched Physical Activity with individuals with Arthritis.







Conclusions are as expected, including:



* Diet alone can help lose weight

* Exercise alone can help lose weight


* Combo diet & exercise PRODUCED THE MOST BENEFICIAL results in managing joint pain.


So, supersize your personal ideals of weight loss with taking a deep look at the food on your plate and the exercise intensity, duration, and frequency.


When you decide to lose weight, mentally order your own personal combo of expectations!


The Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute has a 6 week wellness programs and medically based fitness programs directed and supervised by Physical Therapist. Joint conservative programs will get you back to your normal life by vacation this summer!






Friday, May 20, 2011

Ouch! Joint pain adversity creates Opportunity.



As a businessman and Physical Therapist, I often ask folks to look at joint pain as an opportunity. Here is what I mean.



In business, there is always opportunity in the face of adversity. As an example, GE suffered from a slump in sales during the early 70s until the roll out of the microwave oven. Chrysler Auto almost went belly up in the 80s, bailed out by the government and energized with new leadership, became the textbook example of how to seek opportunity in the face of adversity.

In Physical Therapy, we challenge assumptions. To say its joint pain "because I'm just getting old" diminishes your opportunity to maintain an active, independent, and pain-free lifestyle.

Guess What? Your joint pain is your bodies communication system screaming "Opportunity". Your brain teaches right from wrong, informing your brain of movements to avoid. Perfect time to do a self S.W.O.T of your joint!

For example, a man recently in our clinic with plantar fasciitis:


Strength: His other foot! All other joints in good shape right now!
Weakness: He can't walk without immobilization of my left foot.
Opportunity: Insurance covers a doctor appointment and Physical Therapy
Threat: If I ignored, vulnerable knee, surgically repaired years ago, will act up (again!).


He went to the doctor last night, took much anticipated x-ray, learned more about his specific foot (also with heel spur, tendonitis, and mile OA), and starting active PT us.


Next week, he returns to running! He took advantage of the opportunity to see a specialist after assuming for the last 6 months he could work through it. Self S.W.O.T created his opportunity, and now he is on the road to recovery.


Robert Babb, PT, MBA

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

Broad Street ReRunners High



































Broad Street ReRun 2011 is over, and a whole buncha people ran through the wet streets of Lansdale and Upper Gwynedd last Saturday, May 14th, hooting and hollering, doing it the Broad Street way.


Special Thanks to the hundreds of kids, parents, brothers, sisters, moms, dads, grandmoms, granddads, police, fire, ambulance, and all others who took a few hours out of their Saturday Morning to contribute to this worthy cause.


Look for winners, information for next years run, and pre-register now to save!




See you next year on the Broad Street, Lansdale/Upper Gwynedd!






































Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Call out for Volunteers!






The Broad Street ReRun is in need of Volunteers!









Set up, clean up, Table loaders, Water handouts, and a whole lot more. Consider emailing us today (wkfiles@comcast.net) to volunteer your time to this awesome cause. See http://www.broadstreetrerun.com or www.ptwinstitute.com for more information.









Monday, May 2, 2011

Upper Gwynedd's Broad Street ReRun is for Champions!




Mellissa Heinz is a 21 year-old student and champion swimmer from St. Francis College in Pennsylvania with a zest for fitness and sports. What separates her from others is just some defect in her genes, limiting her clotting factor in her blood. Taking care of herself is more than just exercise, but its exercise and protection, prevention, and a little common sense.


" Living with a bleeding disorder has certainly not slowed me down, and I want to show others that it doesn't have to slow them down either", states Mellissa. Mellissa should know too, just finishing her college swim carreer this past spring as back to back division one Northeast Conference Swim champs! Since swimming is behind her, she now takes on a new challenge, starting with the 5 mile Broad Street ReRun, in Upper Gwynedd and Lansdale, on May 14th this year.


Consider joining Mellissa and over 1000 other runners by running this great event in support of those in the Delaware Valley who manage bleeding disorders day in and day out.


See http://www.broadstreetrerun.com/ for more information.



Robert Babb, PT, MBA




Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Foot Pain Gotcha waving the white flag???




First step in the mornings causing you to jump? The pain in the bottom of your foot severe enough you can’t walk around the home without shoes? Good chance, its the ol heel spurs or plantar fasciitis syndromes, both painful conditions that affect your quality of life.



Because many folks may be living with a heel spur, which may or may not be painful, treatment for this “Painful Foot Syndrome” is often the same at the conservative level, then more focused if conservative treatment fails.



Conservative treatment may include active rest, part of which may mean identifying the activity that causes the pain the most and eliminating it from your routine for several weeks or months. As an example, if running on the treadmill has become painful, change your routine to elliptical conditioning.



Also, worn down or old (greater than 3 to 6 months) running sneaks or daily shoes may warrant a closer look into your shoe wear and foot function. Physical Therapists, podiatrists, and even running store personal can differentiate difficulties with both the front and rear portions of your foot. They can recommend shoe orthotics or inserts that may offer more support to imbalances in your foot. Or it may be something simple as reaching into your wallet and getting a new pair!




Self-treatment may include a variety of modalities including ice (10 minutes after activity and up to 10 times a day), heat (Consider foot warmers!) and self-stretching, foot massage, and warm baths. Physical Therapy research suggests the use of nighttime splints (which keep a low grade stretch to your foot) may help.



Finally, physical therapy can help with modalities of ultrasound, electrical stimulation, manual mobilizations and stretching, and identifying underlying imbalances that may be causing this problem. Physical Therapists are trained in musculoskeletal evaluations, biomechanics and dysfunction with movement.



For a complimentary screening of your foot pain or any other joint pain issues you may want a professional to look at, call PTW today (215-855-9871) to schedule an appoiintment with one of our 12 Physical Therapists.

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Last Call for Defibrillator Give Away!

Log onto www.ptwinstitute.com for forms, fill out for an organization, community center, or individual who may have a need for a defibrillator. Next week, Folks from PTW, Village Tavern, the Reporter, and the Montgomery Township Business Group will vote. Cast your entries today, you have to know someone, someplace that could use one! Don't be caught without one when in need.

Friday, April 8, 2011

Difference in Opinions (Physical Therapy vs. Family doctors)




Family docs have your best interest in mind, Physical Therapist (PT) have your movement and mobility interest in mind.




For example: When you say:


"I have pain"


Doc says: Don't do it

PT says: Do it a different way



or, When you say:


"I sprained my back"


Doc says: Rest it

PT says: Active rest it




or even, When you say:


"I sprained my knee"


Doc says: Immobilize it

PT says: Quad set it, if pain free, couple thousand a day



Who is right??? Both are. Your doctor expects a joint to heal, a Physical Therapist expects you to heal while you are maintaining or restoring your function.


Call a PT today for your ache, injury, or surgical recovery.


Robert Babb, PT, MBA

The Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute






References:


Thursday, March 31, 2011

Going into business Headless!



When your first start a new business, you are told the numbers of a business failing are stagering! So many people tell you why it won't work, at times you feel like you have lost your head in your pursuit of a business model!


When we started 9 years ago, we were told to watch your business closely, there is a better chance you will fail rather than succeed.


As an example, there was a less than 35% chance PTW would make it past the 9th year

(http://blog.globalbx.com/2008/10/06/small-business-statistics-and-failure-rates/). Also, we were in the beginning of the stock market losing up to 40% of its value, causing many to lose jobs. Banks became more stringent with lending practices, making money harder to come by.


Happy to say, we are still doing our work, creating opportunities for folks to come see us in order to achieve higher levels of function and performance.


Remaining steadfast to our mission (To Deliver Quality Driven Physical Therapy and Quantifiable Fitness/Wellness Services to our valued customers while exceeding their expections in all areas of the delivery of care), we work off old fashion principles of good business including:


1. Exceeding expectations

2. No wait Therapy

3. Emphathetic listening skills

4. Living with Urgency in our day

5. Creating good will (kitcen table conversation)


Although there is only a 10% chance we will be here 10 years from now, I have a feeling that its gonna be a good outcome and we'll still be standing.


So, keep your head together and communicate constantly your message with your employees while remaining steadfast to your core values, your mission, and the principles that guide your business...its all it takes to keep it going!


Robert Babb, PT, MBA


Monday, March 28, 2011

Got Pain? Move it, for your own good.




In the this months copy (April) of the J.A.P.T (Journal of American Physical Therapy), Fear-Avoidance with those with back pain is explored.


What does it all mean and what is the conclusion?


1. If you have Chronic, intermittent low back pain; you should be aware that fear of further injury may cause you to avoid certain movments or activities, which can lead to worse outcomes in the future.


2. If you are fearful of movement, you are at a higher risk of falling.


How can Physical Therapy help? Physical Therapist are trained as movement specialist. Moving body, learning new movements, and keeping active are part of a successful rehabilitation, and Physical Therapists at PTW are practice with an eye towards restoring function and movement.



reference: JAPT, Vol 91, April 2011, pg 525-533




Thursday, March 24, 2011

What Opraha Forgot! (You can't control it)


Today, Oprah listed 7 things no one tells you about ageing.
http://www.oprah.com/style/7-Things-Nobody-Ever-Tells-You-About-Aging_1/3

She covers the facts:


1. More hair on your face (and guys in their nose and ears!)
2. Your hair on your head thins (Not a problem with some who lost it at 20!)
3. Your Eyebrows become sparse (My wife can save time from plucking!)
4. Your nose and ears keep growing (remember George Burns? What ears!)
5. Your teeth become more prominent (why don't older people get braces then?)
6. Your hands get spotted (and face)
7. Your feet become Gnarly (YUK!)

Morale of the story?
These are all things we can not control.

So, control your own health. Eat well, exercise plenty, laugh at yourself, find a hobby, discover passion in your job, have faith, and then you too can enjoy watching the 7 things about ageing that you cannot control. With good health and some luck (stay away from moving trains!), you can watch Oprah's ageing happen on you!

Monday, March 21, 2011

Dancing with the Stars is Back, dust off your shoes and Dance!


The wildly popular Dancing with the stars is back for its 12th season, can you guess who will win?

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-31749_162-20044700-10391698.html

Watching is fun, but don’t be a wall hugger when it comes to going out and dancing some yourself. The Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons position on physical activity lists dancing as a good option for your daily physical activity.


http://www.aaos.org/about/papers/position/1138.asp

Some Weight-Bearing Exercises to Build Strong Bones:


• Brisk walking, jogging, and hiking.
• Yard work such as pushing a lawnmower and heavy gardening.
• Team sports, such as soccer, baseball, and basketball.
• Dancing, step aerobics, and stair climbing.
• Tennis and other racquet sports.
• Skiing, skating, karate, and bowling.
• Weight training with free weights or machines.

Well, as a Physical Therapist, I like to tell people simply stay active is good, and dancing is a great way to stay active. Dancing helps with

1. Flexibility


Most dance classes begin with a warm up and stretch. If you are at Vinnie’s wedding, make sure you work your way up to DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince with by starting with some Frank Sinatra. Dancing requires motion, motion requires flexibility, and flexibility requires warmth, so warm up first with light dancing. Once you feel “your groove”, go ahead and tackle the fast ones.

2. Strength


Large and small muscle groups are challenged dancing. Mini-squats, movement change in directions, and small jumps/steps all contribute to building muscle mass.

3. Endurance


Most weddings and dance clubs end appropriately with a slow dance, giving you time to cool down after a long night of movement. The longer the Heart rate stays elevated, hopefully in your training zone [220-your age) * .7], the more you can endure physically in life (and some say mentally) with better physical endurance.

So when you’re watching the first episode of Dancing with the stars, plug in your Wii or Xbox each commercial break, plug in a good interactive dance game (Just Dance 2, etc.) and strut to your own dance moves….it’s for your health!

Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Staying active and Injury free!


78 million baby boomers. Our bones are ageing, our joints are getting stiffer, our muscles decrease in strength beginning in our 4th decade of life. The Dept of Health and Human Services state adults should exercise 150 minutes a week.

Physical Therapists extensive knowledge (up to 7 years, most now Doctors) of anatomy, physiology, and exercise will serve you well in setting up an appropriate exercise program to keep you healthy deep into your golden years. For those who are overweight or have a physical disability, PTW can perform an evalution and devise safe exercise programs that increase strength and cardiovascular endurance, restore flexibility, and reduce pain. For those with Type 2 diabetes, PTW can help reducee the need for medications, lower risk of heart disease and stroke, and help manage glucose levels through safe and appropriate physical activties.

Either way, it up to you to get up, move, and give a Physical Therapists a call to establish a life-long habit of exercise.

PTW...
Lansdale...
Montgomeryville...
Quakertown...
West Norriton..

Call today for a program tomorrow!

215 855 9871

Thursday, March 3, 2011

Quality Physical Therapy Busy


A local collegue of mine (and ex employee) recently commented about our practice, stating "You guys are always busy, and you handle the up and down trends in visits (that occur normally in our practice) so well". Recently he left town for career change, but still kept hours as a PT in a busy fitness center. With the "Muscle Head" mentality of the health clubs, he told me he was frustrated working in a fitness center.


After a big smile and giant "Thank You", we went on to define "quality care". At PTW, we define is as:


1. Appointment within 24 hours of your first phone call

2. Patient goal directed care (contrary to some centers who direct care without asking what they can help you get back to)

3. Staffed every day for a no wait policy on each and every visit (PTW has no waiting rooms)

4 Constant contact with your Physician, your family, or your place of work, if necessary

5. PT specific equipment and technology found with PT industry leaders

6. All Physical Therapists are Members of our Association, volunteer in our communities, and attend up to 5 continuing education courses to remain relevant and up to date

7. Flexibility in our hours to meet your needs, from 6:30 am to 7 pm and Saturday appointments.

8. A "Healing Arts" traditional and holistic approach of PT not found in busy fitness centers.


With 4 clinics, a group practie of 11 Physical Therapists, and a staff of 40, we relentlessly strive to exceed the expecations of all our customers in all areas of the delivery of care.


We have been blessed with a crew of true professionals that focus on the customer first.


For bodies under repair in the most traditional sense, go ahead and give us a call. We'll be ready and able to take your call now for an appointment tomorrow.


Robert Babb, PT, MBA


Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Take Minutes off Your Run!


Getting ready for any of the two PTW run's coming up? (The Shock Run or the Broad Street ReRun - seen above with 600 runners).


Join us on March 12th at 8:00 am for a runners clinic, aimed towards educating you on the rights and wrongs of your preparation, training, and strategies of running. In the end, we expect you to have your best 5k or best 5 mile run ever!


Who: Beginning to intermediate runners preparing for their spring runs


Talks by

Dr. Art Donley, DPM, Marathon Veteran

Scott Tartino, Owner, North Wales running

Andrew Seo, Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute


What: Runners Clinic

"How to take Minutes of your run"


When: Saturday, March 12th, 8 am, until 9;15 am.


Where: Physical Therapy & Wellness Insitute, Montgomeryville (Costco Shopping Center)


Call today to reserve you seat.
Free food and beverage provided. 215 855 9871


Friday, February 11, 2011

Broken Hearts, Broken Bones in West Norriton


Can't go on a bowling date because of chronic back pain?

Don't get heart broken



Broken bones becuase of the snow?

Don't lose function



The Professionals at PTW are ready and willing to help you come off this snow filled winter season.

Aquatic Therapy for low back pain is a great way to get you running again!




See more at http://www.ptwinstitute.com/ or call us at
215 855 9871
to schedule to see one our orthopedic experts.




Monday, January 31, 2011

Shovel Right!

This mornings reporter's article "Health Care Professionals share tips to keep you safe this winter"
http://thereporteronline.com/articles/2011/01/31/news/doc4d4646ea9d2a8321434914.txt
missed the beat on "Healthy tips when shoveling". Snow shoveling can increase injuries to the back, shoulders and wrists. The improper use of equipment combined with performing unfamiliar exercises increases the likelihood of injuries form shoveling. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons offers the following safety tips for shoveling.

1. Dress appropriately. Light, layered, water-repellent clothing provides both ventilation and insulation. It is also important to wear the appropriate head coverings, as well as mittens or gloves and thick, warm socks.

2. Pace yourself. Snow shoveling and blowing are aerobic activities, comparable to weightlifting. Take frequent breaks and replenish fluids to prevent dehydration. If you experience chest pain, shortness of breath or other signs of a heart attack, seek emergency care, such as by calling 9-1-1.

3. Warm-up your muscles. Shoveling can be a vigorous activity. Before you begin this physical workout, warm-up your muscles for 10 minutes with light exercise.Clear snow early and often. Begin when a light covering of snow is on the ground to avoid shoveling packed, heavy snow.

4. Use a shovel that is comfortable for your height and strength. Do not use a shovel that is too heavy or too long. Space your hands on the tool grip to increase your leverage.Push the snow instead of lifting it, but if you must lift, do it properly. Squat with your legs apart, knees bent and back straight.

5. Lift with your legs, without bending at the waist. Scoop small amounts of snow into the shovel and walk to where you want to dump it. Holding a shovelful of snow with your arms outstretched puts too much weight on your spine. Never remove deep snow all at once; do it piecemeal.

6. Do not throw the snow over your shoulder or to the side. This requires a twisting motion that stresses your back. Push snow or lift (with your legs doing the work) and throw forward, without rotating.

7. See what you are shoveling. Do not let a hat or scarf block your vision. Watch for ice patches and uneven surfaces.

8. Avoid falls by wearing shoes or boots that have slip-resistant soles. If you do suffer an injury, remember to take care of your injured body part quickly. This usually involves the use of rest, ice, compression, and elevation

At the Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute, you can see our Physical Therapist without physician referral and get immediate treatment for your sprains, strains, and muscle aches. Remember, the earlier you start treatment after injury, the earlier you recover from the pain

Shovel Right



Physical Therapy Tips on Being Careful with Shoveling.
This mornings reporter's article "Health Care Professionals share tips to keep you safe this winter"



missed the beat on "Healthy tips when shoveling". So, here they are:


According to The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, snow shoveling can increase injuries to the back, shoulders and wrists. The improper use of equipment combined with performing unfamiliar exercises increases the likelihood of injuries form shoveling. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons offers the following safety tips for shoveling.

1. Dress appropriately. Light, layered, water-repellent clothing provides both ventilation and insulation. It is also important to wear the appropriate head coverings, as well as mittens or gloves and thick, warm socks.

2. Pace yourself. Snow shoveling and blowing are aerobic activities, comparable to weightlifting. Take frequent breaks and replenish fluids to prevent dehydration. If you experience chest pain, shortness of breath or other signs of a heart attack, seek emergency care, such as by calling 9-1-1.

3. Warm-up your muscles. Shoveling can be a vigorous activity. Before you begin this physical workout, warm-up your muscles for 10 minutes with light exercise.
Clear snow early and often. Begin when a light covering of snow is on the ground to avoid shoveling packed, heavy snow.

4. Use a shovel that is comfortable for your height and strength. Do not use a shovel that is too heavy or too long. Space your hands on the tool grip to increase your leverage.
Push the snow instead of lifting it, but if you must lift, do it properly. Squat with your legs apart, knees bent and back straight.

5. Lift with your legs, without bending at the waist. Scoop small amounts of snow into the shovel and walk to where you want to dump it. Holding a shovelful of snow with your arms outstretched puts too much weight on your spine. Never remove deep snow all at once; do it piecemeal.

6. Do not throw the snow over your shoulder or to the side. This requires a twisting motion that stresses your back. Push snow or lift (with your legs doing the work) and throw forward, without rotating.


7. See what you are shoveling. Do not let a hat or scarf block your vision. Watch for ice patches and uneven surfaces.


8. Avoid falls by wearing shoes or boots that have slip-resistant soles. If you do suffer an injury, remember to take care of your injured body part quickly. This usually involves the use of rest, ice, compression, and elevation.



At the Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute, you can see our Physical Therapist without physician referral and get immediate treatment for your sprains, strains, and muscle aches. Remember, the earlier you start treatment after injury, the earlier you recover from the pain.

Friday, January 28, 2011

St Patty's Shock Run


Become a shock jock!


Run this 5K to support our mission of placing a defibrillator in each and every location that needs one, each year donating a several after the St Patty's Day Shock run. Beginning at the Village Tavern in Montgomeryville, and ending at the Village Tavern in Montgomeryville with a free pint of guiness and complimentary irish lunch, runners will pass through the flat streets of Montgomeryville dressed in their brightest green St Pattys attire. Come on out to shock the world with your green outfit, run for a worthy cause, and enjoy a beer and lunch on us!


When: Sunday, 3/13/2011, 10 am (1 mile fun run at 9;45 am)






Thursday, January 27, 2011

Broad Street ReRun Lansdale


So you didn't get in to the Broad Street 10 mile Run in Philly?


Registration is already closed! NO NEED TO WORRY! You can go ½ the distance with less traffic, no port-o-potty lines and it wont take you 15 minutes to cross the starting line and best of all you wont have to get up 3 hours before race time to make sure you get there in time! Register for the BROAD STREET RERUN at www.ptwinstitute.com. This is a first class event with great food, lots for the kids to do including a ½ mile kid run and this year we have upgraded to a "technical" tee! Navy Blue in color! Some new items this year, a small first aid kit to all registered runners and the first 200 over the finish line gets a 2nd t-shirt courtesy of one of our sponsors! Put this race on your calendar and think "Spring"! May 14th is right around the corner....so get running and see you on Broad Street in Lansdale on Saturday, May 14th, 2011!

Brought to you by the Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute and the Del Val Chapter of the National Hemophilia Foundation.

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

West Norriton Physical Therapy - Trooper


Time is yours!
With just 168 hours in the week, finding time to take care of yourself is a challenge. The Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute, located just off Trooper road in West Norriton, is open early, stays late, and open on Saturdays to help you manage your joint pain, muscle aches, movement disorders, or loss of sport/recreational abilities.


Contact us today; Physical Therapy, Wellness Programs, Fitness, Work Injury Care, Motor Vehicle accident Care, decades of experience, 10 Physical Therapist, all with advanced degrees, most having earned their direct access priveledges (no referral needed).


Log onto http://www.ptwinstitute.com/ for more information.

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

North Penn Physical Therapy


PTW has been rated North Penn's Best Physical Therapy for 9 consecutive years.


With 10 Physical Therapists, 6 doctors of Physical Therapy, early morning (6:30 am) hours, evening hours, and Saturday hours, its our desire to continue to keep up with evidence based decisions, one-on-one care that can be matched by no others in the community. Call today to see the professionals that make a difference.


Bodies Under Repair

Friday, January 7, 2011

Quakertown Physical Therapy's Julia Yunuska, Director


The Physical Therapy & Wellness Institute will hold our 7th annual open house in February, with the feature educational talk on shoulder pain by Dr. James Hurley, Orthopedic Surgeon.


Log onto www.ptwinstitute.com on January 15ht for more information coming soon!!